Tallulah Falls, Georgia – Worth the Effort to See the Gorge

The picture above is the 63 acre Tallulah Lake

Tallulah Falls is a town in Habersham and Rabun counties.  It is a very small town the population was 168 in the 2010 census. Tallulah Falls started out in the 1880s as a tourist town for the multitude of visitors who came by train.   Today a multitude of visitors still visit Tallulah Falls.

Tallulah Gorge State Park – One of the most spectacular canyons in the eastern U.S., Tallulah Gorge is two miles long and nearly 1,000 feet deep. Rim trails lead to several overlooks.  A suspension bridge sways 80 feet above the rocky bottom, providing spectacular views of the river and 6 waterfalls.  Exhibits in the park’s Jane Hurt Yarn Interpretive Center highlight the rich history of Tallulah.  A theater shows an award-winning film of the gorge.   The park is 2,739 acres and has a 63-acre lake.  It has 50 campsites, pioneer camping, 20 miles of hiking trails, swimming and fishing. Rock climbing was suspended when I was there at the end of May because of the Peregrine Falcons.    Jane Hurt Yarn Road

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Jane Hurt Yan Interpretive Center

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Tallulah Falls Railway and Depot

Construction of Tallulah Falls Railway began in 1871 at Cornelia, GA, reached Tallulah Falls in 1882, and extended to Franklin, NC, by 1907. As the northern terminus of the rail line for over twenty years, Tallulah Falls became a popular resort town. Trading opportunities also increased for this remote region and the depot served as a social center. The original depot burned in 1912 and was replaced by the present building in 1913-14. With a decline in tourism, passenger rail service ended by 1946. Ongoing repair costs and mounting debt forced the railway to cease operations in 1961.  On Hwy 441

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HISTORICAL MARKER IN FRONT OF THE DEPOT

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Moss House – R.H. Moss of Athens built several structures in Tallulah Falls in the late 19th century, including the Cliff House Hotel and this family home. Located just south of the train depot, it escaped the Great Fire of 1921. This home remained in the Moss family from 1879 until 1981 when it was sold to a developer. In recent years, it housed Isabelle’s Restaurant.  Moss Street

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Indian Springs Trading Post – has Native American crafts, local crafts, chainsaw art, antiques and rocks.  On Tallulah Gorge Scenic Loop

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Tallulah Point Overlook – since 1912 the restaurant/store is open daily year round. The store has souvenirs, knives, toys, snacks and drinks.  The deck on the back has a different view of the gorge.  On Tallulah Gorge Scenic Loop

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lakeside view of dam – stairs at the edge of the bridge,  picture can be taken of the front side of dam

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LAKESIDE OF DAM

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